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Animations to support Scotland's doctors, nurses and carers deal with death


14-June-2016

Doctors, nurses and other care specialists in Scotland are being provided with innovative new resources, including animations, to help them deal with one of the most difficult situations they will experience in their careers – death and bereavement. 

A series of animations, a new website, information posters and links to a host of other resources have been developed by NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and were launched today (Tuesday 14 June). 

The resources include animations supporting staff to discuss dying, talking to children who are bereaved and understanding the processes following a sudden or unexplained death. A sample video can be seen here http://bit.ly/1XS1egZ 

The video helping professionals care for bereaved children was voiced by child actors and scripted by Edinburgh charity Richmond’s Hope. 

Dr Clare Tucker who has been leading the development of the resources said: “Support around expected and sudden deaths by healthcare professionals is an important part of improving bereavement care in Scotland. 

“Caring for the dying, supporting families dealing with anticipatory grief around the time of death and in bereavement is core business for medical teams. But healthcare staff need support and advice as well in order to deliver the best care possible for those going through some of the worst moments in their lives.”

Caroline Lamb, chief executive of NHS Education for Scotland said: “While some specialists may deal with death and bereavement almost on a daily basis, many professionals will encounter bereavement situations very rarely in their careers, particularly unexpected deaths. 

“This can lead to anxiety and stress, not being able to find the right words to say or even knowing where to turn to for support. These bite sized animations and additional support will reduce the fear of the unknown and lead to greater and better support for Scotland’s NHS workforce and those they are caring for.” 

The creation of these resources, along with the other activities which are underway to improve bereavement education for health and social care professionals has involved the Scottish Government, General Medical Council, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and Faculties in Scotland, undergraduate medical schools, postgraduate medical specialty representatives and various third sector organisations.

ENDS

For more information contact:Stuart Baird, Tel. 07799 678009 

 

Editors notes 

To view the animations and access the resources please go to http://www.sad.scot.nhs.uk/

NHS Education for Scotland (NES) is a national special health board working to provide education, training and workforce development for those who work in and with NHS Scotland. 

Our aim is to provide excellence in health and care for the people of Scotland through high quality education, training and development. 

We recruit, fund, manage training progression, and quality assure the workplace training placements for post-graduate professionals in key disciplines including medicine, dentistry, clinical psychology, pharmacy and healthcare science.  We also support undergraduate placements in medicine and nursing.  

In everything we do we work in partnership with NHS Boards, with national regulatory bodies, with Scotland’s universities and colleges and with organisations such as SSSC and SFC. We operate across Scotland and maintain a local perspective through our bases in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Aberdeen and Inverness. 

Key figures: throughout 2014-15 our work included...

 

o   Support for 5,700 trainee doctors

 

o   Training 1,000 staff in clinical skills

 

o   Training 322 Family Nurse Partnership Practitioners

 

o   Revalidating 400 medical trainees

 

o   Funding 160 dental vocational training places

 

o   Overseeing a 96% pass rate of trainees on the pre-registration pharmacist scheme

 

o   Provided events for 200 health visitors and practice teachers

 

o   93 Pharmacists Commissioned to undertake prescribing qualifications

 

o   111 applications supported for the AHP Career Fellowship Scheme

 

o   322 practitioners trained via the Psychology of Parenting Project

 

o   2.1 million searches on the Knowledge Network